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The Archaeology Centre Presents: A lecture by Dr. Emma Yasui, "In a Nutshell: Examining the Oversimplification of Jomon Period Ground Stone through Starch Grain Analysis in Southern Hokkaido Japan
The Archaeology Centre presents a virtual lecture by Dr. Emma Yasui (Archaeology Centre Research Associate, UofT) on, "In a Nutshell: Examining the Oversimplification of Jomon Period Ground Stone through Starch Grain Analysis in Southern Hokkaido, Japan."

Abstract:
For many decades, grinding tools from the Jomon Period (ca. 16,500 – 2,300 years ago) have been characterized as plant-processing implements. Over time, grinding and crushing tools have become strongly associated with the use of tree nuts, to the point where the quantity of ground stone at sites is considered a proxy indicator for the importance of nuts in Jomon subsistence and diet. This narrative about the centrality of nuts and their relationship to grinding tools has been further complicated by the popularity of such interpretations with public audiences. Academic publications are thus part of a larger picture, where museum displays, pop culture, media, textbook summaries, and tourism promotions are all contributing to the idea that Jomon people relied heavily on cracked and ground nuts. But the question remains, do the tools themselves support this view? For my talk, I will discuss the current perspective from starch research in northern Japan, including what residue analysis is contributing to our understanding of Jomon foodways and how evidence from microremain studies challenge the wider perception of Jomon ground stone technology.

Nov 5, 2021 03:00 PM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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