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Missed Opportunities: The Impact of Recent Policies on Energy Efficiency Programs in Midwestern States - Shared screen with speaker view
Emily Pauli
36:50
This is not an industrial exemption but a large customer exemption.
Greg Ehrendreich - MEEA
45:13
Emily - Yes, that's correct. When we talk about industrial opt outs or exemptions it does generally mean "large C&I" - it's a shorthandIt's generally based on load size, rather than specific customer class
Emily Pauli
47:31
Thanks Greg, wanted to clarify, at least for IL FEJA, since commercial customers were also affected by the exclusion.
Greg Ehrendreich - MEEA
51:13
Elie - we didn't have the same kind of regressive policy change in Michigan - though there have been policy changes there, they have generally been moving in the forward direction for EE.
Martin Kushler
59:10
Would you be able to do a quick update for natural gas results, given what has happened in the market this year & the new projections?
Greg Ehrendreich - MEEA
59:39
Gonna save that one for the Q&A at the end Marty
Martin Kushler
01:04:04
Greg, that's fine.
Amalia Hicks
01:16:56
which value of SCC was used?
Amalia Hicks
01:17:11
Also, what year are these $$ being compared in? (2021 dollars)?
Greg Ehrendreich - MEEA
01:19:18
Thanks for the question Amalia. Here's what Kenji had earlier on his slide about the SCC: The SCC values recommended by the recent AESC (Avoided Energy Supply Component) study for New England states. The values are based on the estimates by New York State’s Department of Environmental Conservation (Obama EPA’s guidelines with a lower discount rate).Increases from $118 per ton in 2021 to $290 per ton by 2050
Martin Kushler
01:19:31
Apologize if I missed this, but are these annual impacts? Or cumulative since the date of the policy change?
Tim Woolf - Synapse
01:19:54
These are annual impacts.
Martin Kushler
01:20:46
Impressive.
Amalia Hicks
01:29:52
Thanks Tim! Was that a response to my questions? The value of a dollar changes from year to year due to inflation, and the SCC value changes as well. So are all the impacts from each state being compared in the same year? Did you use IWG SCC values?
Greg Ehrendreich - MEEA
01:30:26
I'm not sure on the answer for that but we'll ask it in the Q&A, Amalia
Amalia Hicks
01:30:32
Thanks!
Amalia Hicks
01:31:38
Unfortunately I have to drop for another call but maybe I can catch up with you later. Thank you!!! Very interesting work.
Bret Carlson
01:31:41
If average annual rates are decreasing for customers, how is it that bill rates are increasing?
Emmy Riley
01:32:09
I think Kenji said it's because there are no EE programs in place helping reduce energy use
Greg Ehrendreich - MEEA
01:32:15
Bret - because the value of the lost energy savings is higher than the change due to the rate increase
Bret Carlson
01:32:39
got it, thanks
Tim Woolf - Synapse
01:33:01
In general EE will increase rates but reduce average bills. Reduced EE means that there are educed rates but increase bills.
Tim Woolf - Synapse
01:35:15
We used IWG SCC values, In real terms. In real terms, the values increase each year.
Greg Ehrendreich - MEEA
01:46:59
Amalia - are your questions answered or do you have any more?
Midwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (MEEA)
01:50:15
Please raise your hand if you would like to be unmuted.
Martin Kushler
01:51:46
Will MEEA be tracking any 'pick-up' of these study results in the press and/or govt. proceedings?
Greg Ehrendreich - MEEA
01:55:02
Thanks for attending everyone!