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Webinar Short: Land Acknowledgements - Shared screen with speaker view
Paul Treadwell
18:53
Good morning from Central New York!
Rebekah Dobrasko
19:02
Hello! I'm Rebekah Dobrasko from Austin, TX!
Rachel Lambie
19:07
Good morning! My name is Rachel and I am the curator at the Lac-Brome Museum in the Eastern Townships, Québec, Canada.
Laura Chalus
19:17
Happy Wednesday from Tulsa, Oklahoma!
Wren Wheeler
19:18
Good morning! It's 7am here in the unceeded land of the Coast Salish and Duwamish peoples.
Daniel Stetson
19:20
Good morning from Baton Rouge!
Caitlin Blake
19:21
Good morning from Maryland!
Meg W/NEMA (she)
19:24
Good morning! I’m Meg Winikates, from the New England Museum Association, Zooming in from the homelands of the Massachusett and Wampanoag peoples in the town now known as Sharon MA.
Claudia Ocello
19:31
Hi, Claudia from Museum Partners Consulting LLC and the Independent Museum Professionals Network - here in NJ, homelands of the Lenape.
Rashanda Booker
19:38
Good morning! I am Rashanda Booker at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, MS.
Jennifer Sutherland
19:39
Good Morning from the Canadian Museum of Immigration at Pier 21 in sunny Halifax , Nova Scotia!
Megan Eves
19:39
Hello from a sunny Troy, NY! I’m Megan Eves from the Museum Association of NY.
Toni Woodall
20:28
Good morning. This is Toni at the Carnegie Museum of MC, Indiana.
DeLena Feliciano
20:34
DeLena Feliciano, Knoxville Museum of Art in TN
Kacey Page
20:43
Good morning from Buffalo NY. I am Kacey Page from the Buffalo Museum of Science
Kristin Gallas
21:00
Kristin Gallas from the Tsongas Industrial History Center at Lowell National Historical Park
Michelle Grohe
21:16
Good morning! Michelle Grohe from Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, on the homelands of Massachusett Tribe in Boston, MA.
Claire Du Laney
21:16
Good morning from Omaha, NE. I'm Claire from the University of Nebraska at Omaha
Robin Kilgo
21:26
Hello from the Florida Keys.
Emily Hermans
21:27
Hello from Austin, Texas!
Jeannette Shindell
21:30
Jeannette Ibarra Shindell, from the National Gallery of Art. and the ancestral lands of the Nacotchtank.
Laura Casey
22:06
Hello from Austin, TX!
Karen DePauw
22:21
Good morning from Indiana Historical Society
Stephanie Cain
22:30
Hello from Indiana, ancestral lands of the Potawatomi, Miami, Piankeshaw, and Wea.
Denise Bausch
22:50
Good morning from Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area in Washington State.
Afton Thomas
23:47
Good morning from Oxford, Mississippi at the Center for the Study of Southern Culture on the University of Mississippi campus.
Robert Saarnio
25:38
Also good morning from Oxford, Mississippi, the University of Mississippi (where our multi-faculty Slavery Research Group is an ICSC Academic Affiliate )
Rachel Lambie
27:38
Land acknowledgments have become fairly commonplace in Canada from my experience, but I think the question of why we do it and what it brings is a good one. Saying it isn’t just action
Linda Norris
27:43
Please feel free to share your responses here to any of these questions.
Rachel Lambie
27:46
But it’s a good first step
Karen DePauw
28:04
Is it appropriate to only do them sometimes? Like to do one at the beginning of a program but not to do them every time a visitor comes in?
Paul Treadwell
28:24
I work for a land grant institution and we have a deep and largely unacknowledged debt tp indigenous peoples whos land was appropriate to fund our work.
Toni Woodall
28:25
To educate the general (local) public about the area they live and work in and to extended an olive branch to those who felt they have lost out.
Chloe Bragg
28:26
I used to work in the Southwest where land acknowledgements were more common. Now I'm in a Midwest state with no formally recognized tribes so I mostly just want people to recognize the history of removal that lead to this area
Angeliki Bogiatji
28:34
it's showing respect and honouring the treaties (in Canada)
Michelle Grohe
28:41
Why am I doing this land acknowledgment? As a statement at beginning in public programs, on our website, and on site via signage to refer to not only the past and current presence and use of land by native Tribes, and also to demonstrate our ongoing relationship building with Massachusetts Tribe by sharing what we are learning together as we move forward with current and upcoming projects. The land acknowledgement is part of our relationship building - that is why we are making the statement - to signal we are doing this work and learning, updating how we tell our stories
Melinda Hunt
28:45
We are trying to reconcile the history of Hart Island as a whole.
Daniel Stetson
29:01
An aside, last evening on AGT a native American performer was acknowledged as a success and was "taking America back." This made me very uncomfortable, for her and for Howie Mandel. It seemed insensitive and reminded me why we need to acknowledge our full history if wed are ever to grow and move forward.
Kristin Gallas
29:13
We have a colleague (professor) who believes that any acknowledgement should come with a statement on how the "colonialists" (past and present) benefited from the theft of indigenous lands.
Angeliki Bogiatji
29:14
Hello from Canada @the Canadian Museum for Human Rights on Treaty 1 territory and the birthplace of the Metis.
Rachel Lambie
29:26
I also wonder about acknowledging the land when the traditional territory is contested or was inhabited by nomadic tribes - in Montreal you can say it is Mohawk territory, but in Lac-Brome it was Abenaki communities who moved around more. I wonder if that challenge is part of what gives people pause as well
Belle Long
29:36
Dix Park in Raleigh NC hopes to alleviate the invisibility suffered by indigenous people for far too long. They want us to know that they are still here!
Casey Wooster
29:55
It is still not common here in Florida, but we are working to thoughtfully incorporate them into our practice.
Michelle Grohe
29:56
These slides are so helpful to frame the “why” of land acknowledgments - will they be shared afterwards?
Stephanie Cain
30:16
Rachel, that's a question I struggle with, because Indiana had so many tribes pushed through us--for instance, I forget to mention the Shawnee when I did my land acknowledgement just now. Oops!
DeLena Feliciano
30:24
I want to include it in gallery information for a gallery that represents the artists of the area. even though our collection doesn't go back that far I think it should be acknowledged to start. I want docents to be able to acknowledge where we are.
Meg W/NEMA (she)
30:31
I live in an area where there are a lot of Indigenous names attached to landmarks, roads, etc. and so I do land acknowledgements when and where I can to help people think about where they are, and why, and how steeped our daily life is in the ongoing culture and impact of the Indigenous people who lived here first.
Sonnet Takahisa
31:44
Also thinking about land acknowledgements that are not institutional, but personal (ie on zoom)? Raising awareness is important in both instances.
Daniel Stetson
32:09
Kristin Gallas, that is a thoughtful consideration, how did we benefit as a focus of acknowledging a full history.
Sonnet Takahisa
32:24
but it sometimes feels performative! especially given your question about what impact do I want.
Erik Holland
32:28
Hello from North Dakota. I acknowledge that the North Dakota Heritage Center and State Museum here on the North Dakota Capitol complex sits on a small part of Mandan ancestral homeland where they lived and traveled since time immemorial.Here the Mandan flourished—raising corn, beans, squash, and sunflowers to nourish their families and to trade garden produce with other tribes up and down the Missouri River.Part of the Mandan existence is utilization of wild and cultivated plants and animals for sustenance, as well as medicine, to sustain themselves physically and mentally.They continue to be good neighbors—sharing their heritage and friendship today.
Angie Albright
36:55
This visual is just great. What a great way to help viewers re-examine all similar visuals they encounter elsewhere.
Rachel Lambie
39:04
The Canadian Museum of History in Gatineau has some great processes of repatriation in the Canada Hall - things that were once on display that are no longer, and signs up explaining why or why they were repatriated. I liked the transparency
Scarlett Hoey
40:01
The Tomaquag Museum shop has more than 25 Indigenous artists featured:. https://www.tomaquagmuseum.org/giftshop
Sonnet Takahisa
41:40
well said Linda!
Paul Treadwell
42:21
will slides be shared after the meeting ends?
Robin Kilgo
43:12
Do you have advice for an organization which is largely virtual? Or spans a country?
Nuriyah Bone'-Owens
43:32
Could you explain the focus of the annual treaty ceremony given that so many of the treaties weren't honored?
Daniel Stetson
44:03
Could we go back to earlier slides while the discussion is going on? They had good information to absorb.
DeLena Feliciano
44:51
how do you acknowledge all the people of an area and not just the main "everyone knows..."? I live in East Tennessee but I know there were more tribes/nations than just Cherokee. How far back should you go?
Nuriyah Bone'-Owens
45:03
Thank you.
Michelle Grohe
45:07
Do you have any suggestions for how to respond to concerns or questions that museum staff and board may have around if the land acknowledgment could be used as a legal claim on the land?
Melinda Hunt
45:13
How do we approach having public properties acknowledged?
Claudia Ocello
45:28
Reiterating Robin's question above:
Claudia Ocello
45:46
What about programs or groups that are virtual - advice?
DeLena Feliciano
46:01
thank you!
Nuriyah Bone'-Owens
46:03
Is there a federal statement of Land Acknowledgement?
Kristin Glomstad
46:24
I have a related issue to the gift shop consideration -- my institution's annual fundraising gala theme this year is "the Wild West" and I'm concerned (along with several colleagues) how this is going to affect our institution's efforts to decolonize the museum. Our curator and I are working on an artifact cart that presents a more nuanced view of history than that antiquated term suggests, but we obviously need to work to raise visibility and gain buy-in from staff and would appreciate any suggestions to help us all look through this lens in a more comprehensive way
Rachel Lambie
46:28
@Claudia I have attended some virtual events where the leader acknowledges the land where they are, and have invited people to add their own places in the comments
Robert Saarnio
46:28
Proud of my original museum place of curatorial employment, the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, MA. which has done much pathbreaking work with its Native collections, with NAGPRA repatriations, and a groundbreaking exhibition approach, “Gifts of the Spirit”: https://shop.pem.org/products/gifts-of-the-spirit-works-by-nineteenth-century-contemporary-native-american-artists
Michelle Grohe
46:30
Thanks - I’m also researching this with our local native colleagues too
Claudia Ocello
47:02
@Rachel thanks, that is helpful to know
Melinda Hunt
47:20
Could Sites of Conscience facilitate members working on land acknowledgements ie workshops where we work
DeLena Feliciano
47:26
Can we see the resource slide again, please?
DeLena Feliciano
48:00
thanks
Robin Kilgo
48:06
Second that idea! A workshop would be very helpful
Kristin Gallas
48:11
@Kristin - everyone in the institution has to be on the same page about what "wild west" means - what is acceptable and what isn't - and how that's portrayed to visitors.
Kristin Glomstad
48:12
Thank you for that validation. That's exactly it, and I was frankly shocked when I heard the theme. We are in Dubuque, IA
Nuriyah Bone'-Owens
48:27
What is the sentiment of Indigenous nations --official tribal positions - about Land Acknowledgements? How are these acknowledgements resonating with them... too little to late, empty gestures, long overdue ???
Claire Du Laney
48:42
a workshop would be wonderful
Braden Paynter
49:04
Michelle, you might also point to what it looks like when there is legal action, specifically the Supreme Court decision on about half of Oklahoma being indigenous land. Not so much about a cultural organizations land acknowledgement.
Kristin Glomstad
49:43
That's exactly my fear -- guests generally arrive in costume. Thank you. Those are great suggestions
Michelle Grohe
50:13
Thanks Braden!
Rachel Lambie
51:26
Thank you so much for starting this conversation
Michelle Grohe
51:31
Thanks for offering this quick webinar - great tips and resources!
Megan Eves
51:42
Thank you so much for this and for sharing these resources.
Karen DePauw
51:50
Thank you very much, Linda!
Paul Treadwell
51:52
Thank you all. Deeply appreciate all the info and sharing
Rashanda Booker
51:57
Thank you for this informative webinar!
International Coalition of Sites of Conscience
51:59
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International Coalition of Sites of Conscience
52:00
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Robin Kilgo
52:00
Thanks all!
Toni Woodall
52:06
Thank you
Marissa Gamliel
52:10
Thank you so much! This was a great webinar!
Nezka Pfeifer
52:21
Thank you!
Erin Samarasinghe
52:22
Thanks, everyone - really appreciate the sharing
Scarlett Hoey
52:23
Thank you!
Braden Paynter
52:27
And just a reminder to members, colonialism is a global experience. As you interact with members around the globe, good questions to ask them.
Casey Wooster
52:27
Thank you!
Jeannette Shindell
52:27
Thank you!!
Claire Du Laney
52:30
thank you!
Afton Thomas
52:32
Thank you!
Emily Hermans
52:32
Thank you Linda!
Sonnet Takahisa
52:33
appreciate this webinar, and the short format. thanks so much1
Braden Paynter
52:40
Thanks all for coming!
Linda Norris
53:04
Thanks everyone! Feel free to email me if you have additional questions. lnorris@sitesofconsciience.org