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Celebrating The Plant Cell Focus Issue on Plant Biotic Interactions (2)
In May 2022, The Plant Cell presents a Focus Issue on Plant Biotic Interactions. As much as half of all of the calories produced by plant crops is lost to pathogens. Efforts to strengthen plant immunity have led to a deeper understanding of how plants recognize and defend against pathogens while at the same time facilitating symbiotic interactions. Over the past several decades, key interactors on the pathogen side (effectors) and plant side (intracellular and cell-surface immune receptors) have been identified. With such major advancements in our molecular and cellular understanding of plant biotic interactions and the rapid acceleration in research on this topic, this Focus Issue on Plant Biotic Interactions is timely, and full of exciting new work that answers some long-standing questions, while raising many new ones.

Join us the first of a special pair of webinars to celebrate this Focus Issue on Plant Biotic Interactions. The webinars have been organized by the Focus Issue editors: Roger Innes, Dan Kliebenstein, Cris Argueso, Yangnan Gu, Libo Shan, Dorothea Tholl, and Mary Williams. We have invited six speakers whose work appears in this Focus Issue to share their findings, across two different webinar dates and times.

This second webinar features speakers Hana Zand Karim, Tesfaye Mengiste, and Zhongshou Wu sharing their findings from their work appearing in this Focus Issue. The webinar will be hosted by Plant Cell editors Cris Argueso and Libo Shan and moderated by Assistant Features Editor Thomas DeFalco.

May 24, 2022 06:00 PM in London

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Speakers

Hana Zand Karimi
Plant extracellular RNAs and their function in host induced gene silencing
Tesfaye Mengiste
Broad spectrum fungal resistance in sorghum is conferred through a complex regulation of an immune receptor embedded in a natural antisense transcript
Zhongshou Wu
Helper NLR immune receptors in plant immunity