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A Different Approach to Sex Crimes: The Case for Survivor-Centered Restorative Justice
*Panelists*
Alissa Ackerman, Ph.D.
Lara Bazelon
Seema Gajwani
Nuri Nusrat

*Moderator*
Danielle Cooper, Ph.D., CPP

We need to have a different conversation about sexual violence and healing. This presentation will do that, going places some have never gone before. We make progress when we have difficult conversations. When it comes to sexual violence, it is important to address misconceptions that lead to stigmatization and negative stereotyping of those who commit the harm and those who are harmed.

Jan 25, 2022 07:00 PM in Eastern Time (US and Canada)

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Speakers

Alissa Ackerman, Ph.D.
Co-Founder @Ampersands Restorative Justice
Alissa R. Ackerman, Ph.D. (she/her/hers) is an Associate Professor in the Division of Politics, Administration and Justice at California State University, Fullerton and is co-founder of Ampersands Restorative Justice, an organization dedicated to bringing restorative justice for sexual harms to scale. She has spent her career studying sex crimes policy and practice, the etiology of sexual offending, the effects of sexual victimization, and, more recently, restorative justice options for those impacted by sexual harm. She is a “survivor scholar”, in that she integrates her personal experience with sexual violence with her professional expertise as a sex crimes researcher. She facilitates restorative justice cases and trains future restorative justice practitioners. She has worked with over 500 men and women who have perpetrated acts of sexual harm using vicarious restorative justice. Read her full bio at: https://onestandardofjustice.org/alissa-ackerman-ph-d/
Lara Bazelon
Professor @University of San Francisco School of Law
Lara Bazelon is a professor at the University of San Francisco School of Law where she holds the Barnett Chair in Trial Advocacy and directs the criminal and racial justice clinics. Her recent scholarship has focused on restorative justice as an alternative to the criminal adjudicatory process. She is the author of the book RECTIFY: THE POWER OF RESTORATIVE JUSTICE AFTER WRONGFUL CONVICTION (Beacon 2018) and the forthcoming book AMBITIOUS LIKE A MOTHER. Her long form pieces, essays, and op-eds have been published in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic Magazine, Slate, and many other media outlets.
Seema Gajwani
Chief @Restorative Justice Program Section at the D.C. Office of the Attorney General
Seema Gajwani is Special Counsel for Juvenile Justice Reform and Chief of the Restorative Justice Program Section at the D.C. Office of the Attorney General. Prior to this position, Gajwani ran the Criminal Justice Program at the Public Welfare Foundation in Washington, D.C., funding efforts to improve criminal and juvenile justice systems across the country, with a focus on pretrial detention reform and prosecutorial culture change. Gajwani started her career as a trial attorney at the D.C. Public Defender Service representing juvenile and adult defendants for 6 years.
Nuri Nusrat
Restorative Justice Practitioner
As a child of survivors, I want to create the world my parents didn’t have, but deserved. A world in which folks are cared for and supported as they become accountable to those they hurt. A world in which we support people who have been hurt and ask what they need. I have 8 years of restorative justice experience and 15 years supporting those impacted by the criminal system. I’m dedicated to addressing sexual harm through restorative justice, and got to do so through a Soros Justice Fellowship. I have co-facilitated direct dialogues about harm, healing groups for survivors of sexual harm, and healing and accountability groups for folks who have harmed others.
Danielle Cooper, Ph.D., CPP
Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Director of Research @Tow Youth Justice Institute at the University of New Haven
Dr. Danielle Cooper is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and the Director of Research at the Tow Youth Justice Institute at the University of New Haven. Dr. Cooper received her BS in Justice Systems (with a minor in Business Administration) in 2009 and her MA in Criminology from the University of Florida in 2011. She received her PhD in Criminology (with a minor in Organizational Leadership for Nonprofits) from the University of Florida in 2015. During her time in school, she was selected to serve as a McNair Baccalaureate Scholar (as an undergraduate) and a McKnight Doctoral Fellow (as a graduate student), both of which are programs focused on increasing minorities in academia. She currently conducts research in the areas of youths and young adults, juvenile justice and delinquency prevention, criminological theory, and sex offending. Read her full bio at: https://onestandardofjustice.org/danielle-cooper-ph-d-cpp/