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EESCon6 Hybrid Weekend: Day Two
The Sixth EES Congress will be hosted by the Egypt Centre and Swansea University. The Congress will culminate in this hybrid weekend.

Please see the full schedule and abstracts here: https://www.ees.ac.uk/programme

Sunday 2nd October, 09:00-13:30: Day Two

09:00–11:00 – Human-Divine Bodies

A Body in Balance? Historically Contextualising Ancient Egyptian Perspectives of Inner-bodily Sicknesses
Jonny Russell

A musicological reading of a ‘Spell to obtain a good singing voice’
Robert Girling

The Role and Use of Divine Nursing Scenes in Decorative Programs: Analyzing the Contexts of the Divine Nursing Motif
Cannon Fairbairn

Masculinities, Hierarchy, and Representations of the Blind Harper in Ancient Egypt
Kelly-Anne Diamond

11:30–13:00 – First Millennium BCE

In the Realm of Osiris: Latest update on the Osiris-Ptah neb-ankh Research Project at Karnak
Essam Nagy

The organisation of faience production: from the state-control to independent workshops
Urška Furlan

A priestly family in Memphis in the reign of Darius I and before
John Rogers

13:00–13:30 – Closing remarks

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Oct 2, 2022 09:00 AM in London

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Speakers

Jonny Russell (Leiden University)
A Body in Balance? Historically Contextualising Ancient Egyptian Perspectives of Inner-bodily Sicknesses
In the broader narrative of medical history, certain patterns in human perceptions of sickness causation are prevalent. The earliest literature of the so-called ‘big three’ scholarly medical traditions—i.e., the Greek Corpus Hippocraticum, the Chinese Huang-di Nei-jing, and the Indian Āyurvedic Caraka Saṃhitā—all speak uniquely of inner-body balances as consequential to human health. But what ideas characterise the earliest written accounts of healing practices from Egypt and Mesopotamia. Can these be contextualised historically, without imposing a foreign analytical lens in the attempt? This paper will present the results of a lexicographical analysis guided by frameworks adopted from (medical-)anthropology. Using the examples of Egyptian sry.t and Akkadian suālu, it will be shown that a) the concept of balances was not an innovation of the ‘big-three’, and b) the Ancient Near Eastern perspectives of the body and sickness contributed to the Hippocratic idea of phlegm.
Robert Girling (University of Liverpool)
A musicological reading of a ‘Spell to obtain a good singing voice’
Although music played an intrinsic role in the lives of the citizens of Roman Egypt, relatively little is understood about its forms and functions during this time. The 6th-7th century ‘Spell to obtain a good singing voice’ (London Oriental Manuscript 6794) offers perspective of one citizen, an aspiring musician named Severos. While the source’s Sethian and Old-Testament references have been studied for their cultural-religious implications, the less explored musical descriptions provide insights into the performance space, how music was made, and interactions between performer and audience. Examining the themes of music, magic, religion, and identity within the text reveals that Severos was a Copt of lower social status in a Christian climate yet with an awareness of non-Orthodox ritual conventions. While the source cannot confer comprehensive conclusions about musical activities in Roman Egypt, Severos’s petition offers valuable clues for our technical understanding of music-making.
Cannon Fairbarn (University of Birmingham)
The Role and Use of Divine Nursing Scenes in Decorative Programs: Analyzing the Contexts of the Divine Nursing Motif
Depictions of the king being nursed by a goddess appear from the Old Kingdom through the Graeco-Roman period in temples and tombs throughout Egypt. The motif is understood to represent the bestowal of protection and legitimacy on the king upon his rebirth at coronation or after death. In response to a tendency to examine these scenes in isolation from the decorative programs in which they appear, this research analyses the purpose of this motif and divine breastfeeding by examining the scenes’ placements within sacred space and from their relationship with surrounding imagery. I present the case studies of two divine nursing scenes from different temples/tombs, analyzing the role of context in understanding their purpose and use within their respective decorative programs. Additional insight can be gained by examining the changes in the motif’s imagery and text over time.
Kelly-Anne Diamond (Villanova University)
Masculinities, Hierarchy, and Representations of the Blind Harper in Ancient Egypt
Gender studies has established that there is no essential femininity or masculinity, but once gender is ascribed to an individual the social order holds that person to gendered expectations. This paper maintains that there were multiple masculinities in ancient Egypt, and although a gender status emerged through a sex category, it was not uniformly connected to it. I argue that images of the blind harper exhibit multiple characteristics that are associated with femininity, submissiveness, subordination, and lack of virility. This combination of physical attributes marks the blind harper as embodying a form of masculinity that is low in the masculine hierarchy. A bald/shaved head, blindness, chubbiness, middle age, and sitting position unite to varying degrees to embody one construct of masculinity that existed in ancient Egypt. This paper will demonstrate the ways in which the ancient Egyptian artists signaled the blind harper's gendered social status.
Essam Nagy (The Egypt Exploration Society)
In the Realm of Osiris: Latest update on the Osiris-Ptah neb-ankh Research Project at Karnak
The Osiris-Ptah neb-ankh Research Project (OPNARP) was created to study the area of the chapel of Osiris-Ptah neb-ankh and its surrounding area. This Egyptian archaeological mission and research project is focusing on the documentation. conservation, and excavation of the Chapel of Osiris-Ptah neb-ankh in South Karnak. Located just outside the Tenth Pylon along the Sphinx Avenue to the Mut Complex, the chapel was constructed by the Twenty-fifth Dynasty kings Taharqa and Tantamani. The structure is in urgent need of consolidation due to strain from earlier 1922 preservation efforts, and the surrounding site is under threat from degradation and invasive plant life. This project will complete the first full documentation and conservation of the chapel and its unique relief scenes, as well as making the area accessible to tourists. The project is focused on understanding the function of the chapel within the Karnak complex and undertaking targeted excavations to learn more.
Urška Furlan (Swansea University)
The organisation of faience production: from the state-control to independent workshops
The study of crafts and production is one of the key issues of archaeological research, as it can shed light on a variety of subjects, such as economy and trade, as well as characteristics of the society itself. Despite this, it is not a popular aspect of Egyptian archaeology, mostly due to the lack of excavations of such areas, which leads to our limited understanding of workshop activities. While it is believed that the organisation of most crafts in Ancient Egypt was state-controlled, faience production seems to have had more independence and played an important role in the private market. Based on the case study of amulets from the Nile Delta during the first millennium BCE, this paper will explore different types of faience workshops, their (in)dependence on the state, and question the standardisation of production.
John Rogers (Swansea University)
A priestly family in Memphis in the reign of Darius I and before
The administrative and sacerdotal landscape of the Nile Delta during the mid-first millennium BCE is still poorly understood relative to Upper Egypt, due to three key issues, among others: the relative paucity of secure sources, the tendency of early scholarship to marginalise this era as a time of stagnation, and difficulties in establishing local chronological frameworks with any precision. However, in recent years, research of this era and locality has made available from excavations and museum storerooms a wealth of new data which needs systematic study. This paper makes a small contribution towards this goal: by identifying and gathering three stele which can be shown to refer to members of the same family, this paper maps the prosopography of a priestly line through six generations and multiple lines through the Saite period into the third decade of Darius I. In doing so, this paper opens avenues for further exploring the administrative landscape of Lower Egypt.