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EESCon6 Hybrid Weekend: Day One
The Sixth EES Congress will be hosted by the Egypt Centre and Swansea University. The Congress will culminate in this hybrid weekend.

Please see the full schedule and abstracts here: https://www.ees.ac.uk/programme

Saturday 1st October, 12:00-17:30: Day One

12:00–13:00 - Opening Remarks and Keynote Lecture

Welsh Egyptology: The Dragon Roars
Alan Lloyd

13:30–15:30 – Material Culture (I)

Teaching in the Collection: Object-centred learning at Swansea University
Christian Knoblauch

Will the Real Naqada please step forward! Contextualising the finds from the Naqada Region within Swansea’s Egypt Centre Collection
Ken Griffin, Joris van Wetering and Joanne Rowland

A Wellcome Reunion: a set of wooden funerary figures from the dispersed Wellcome collection
Sam Powell

Artefact and Art: Ancient Egyptian museum objects and modern artistic interpretations as impact of Egyptian heritage on the modern world
Katharina Zinn

16:00–17:30 Material Culture (II)

Authenticating Lizard-Shaped Predynastic Palette Manchester Museum 5474
Matt Szafran

Digging in the Irish Archives – Egyptian Collections and Connections
Emmet Jackson

Putting ancient Egyptian plaster in its place. Definitions, development and terminology from the Old Kingdom to the Roman Period
Caterina Zaggia, Julia Dawson, Helen Strudwick, Marcos Martinon-Torres and Matthew Collins

Register in advance using the link below. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Webinars have a limited attendance capacity, so please only sign up if you’re confident that you can attend. We recommend that you join our online events using a PC or laptop.

Speakers will be presenting to an audience in person and online, so we ask for your patience with any technical problems that we may encounter. 

Please ensure that you have read our 'guide to attending EES online events' before the lecture begins: https://www.ees.ac.uk/a-guide-for-attending-ees-online-events

Oct 1, 2022 12:00 PM in London

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Speakers

Alan Lloyd (Swansea University)
Welsh Egyptology: The Dragon Roars
Students of Egyptology of Welsh origin have featured prominently in the history of the subject for more than two centuries, not only nationally but also at an international level. They have functioned in a variety of contexts. The present paper is intended to identify the trends underlying all these developments and, above all, to highlight the achievements of this group of scholars.
Christian Knoblauch (Swansea University)
Teaching in the Collection: Object-centred learning at Swansea University
Evidence-based studies demonstrate that engaging all the senses in object centred learning (OCL) heightens student engagement, provides memorable learning experiences, encourages lifelong learning and enhances appetite for further study or employment. This paper describes and critically analyses the OCL that is employed in two second year Egyptology modules, and an extra-curricular project at Swansea University. I consider from my own experience the challenges of implementing best practice in OCL in a UK HE context. These include challenges encountered at module level (e.g. embedding OCL in course design and lesson planning), at a curriculum-level as well as at an institutional-level (e.g. access to collections, staffing, and crossing administrative/faculty boundaries). The paper concludes that while there are clear benefits to the current offer of OCL design as measured by student attendance, performance, module evaluation and post-graduate study choices.
Ken Griffin (The Egypt Centre, Swansea University), Joris van Wetering (Independent) & Joanne Rowland (University of Edinburgh)
Will the Real Naqada please step forward! Contextualising the finds from the Naqada Region within Swansea’s Egypt Centre
In the 1880-90s, Maspero, Petrie and De Morgan each discovered a different site along the west bank of the Naqada Region and named it ‘Naqada’. Understandably, this has led to some confusion in archaeological research, and the fusing of distinct sites. This paper discusses the three sites: Maspero’s ‘Naqada’ site (1882) with late Old Kingdom – First Intermediate Period remains, Petrie’s ‘Naqada’ site (1894-5) with predominantly Predynastic – Protodynastic (but also Dynastic) remains, and De Morgan’s ‘Naqada’ site (1896) with Early Dynastic remains. Most of the objects from ‘Naqada’ at Swansea are from the Wellcome collection, with no exact provenance. Re-contextualising these enriches our understanding of the diverse profile of local communities especially during the 4th millennium BC, when Nubt (Petrie’s ‘Naqada’ site) was one of the primary political centres, playing a pivotal role in polity formation processes that lead to the establishment of the Old Kingdom.
Sam Powell (University of Birmingham)
A Wellcome Reunion: a set of wooden funerary figures from the dispersed Wellcome collection
This presentation will provide an update on my current PhD research building a typology of ancient Egyptian wooden funerary figures held in UK institutions, focusing on a group of seven figures of food production, which have passed through the collections of Charles James Tabor (1849-1928), Rev. William MacGregor (1848-1936), and Sir Henry Solomon Wellcome (1848-1937), before being split as part of the Wellcome dispersal in the 1970s between the Egypt Centre Swansea, and the World Museum, Liverpool. The virtual reuniting of this group, along with their additional bases, limbs, and accessories which have also been divided across the two museums has added additional context to the items in both collections, and provides a good example of the outcomes of the research visits completed so far for this object-centred thesis.
Katharina Zinn (University of Wales Trinity Saint David)
Artefact & Art: Ancient Egyptian museum objects & modern artistic interpretations as impact of Egyptian heritage on modern world
Recently, archaeology and (museum-)objects more and more inspired a wide variety of artistic expressions. Using this phenomenon as an integral part of heritage engagement and Egyptological teaching, this paper focuses on interesting case studies involving two fine-arts painters, a poet and a ballet choreographer/dancer responding to unprovenanced ancient Egyptian museum artefacts from Cyfarthfa Castle Museum and Art Gallery, Merthyr Tydfil. These modern creative responses to ancient Egyptian material culture form a unique activity called The Museum of Lies as part of annual pop-up exhibitions outside the museum. These creative outcomes are exhibited/performed together with the objects and their academic descriptions as simultaneous types of cultural representations. The emotional power and imagination connected with artistic representations allows to invoke and capture potential inherent to the objects.
Matt Szafran (Independent Scholar)
Authenticating Lizard-Shaped Predynastic Palette Manchester Museum 5474
Manchester 5474 was originally purchased for textile magnate Jesse Haworth by James Quibell, who not only validated its authenticity but also claimed it was an important piece bridging the Naqada era palettes and the later carved palettes such as the Narmer Palette. However, in more recent years it has been seen with scepticism and has been described as most likely a 19th century forgery. Using the results of a Reflective Transformation Imaging and microscopy study, Manchester 5474 will be compared with provenanced palettes from known excavations to investigate and compare the manufacturing marks to attempt to discern whether they are ancient or modern. The place of lizard/crocodiles within Predynastic visual culture will be also considered, along with using statistical data from the Predynastic Palette Database to compare the features of Manchester 5474 with the catalogued corpus of zoomorphic palettes.
Emmet Jackson (Cardiff University)
Digging in the Irish Archives – Egyptian Collections and Connections
In 1952 the National Museum of Ireland found itself in a quandary. A collection of Egyptian objects were donated to the museum but they had no Egyptologists to assess the collection. What followed was a correspondence, over a period of five years, to the British Museum seeking assistance with the matter. Dr Joseph Raftery writing in one such letter states that ‘we have no specialist in Egyptian archaeology nor is the government likely to appoint one. Were we to accept this material we could not do anything other […] than place it in the crypt with the reserve storage collection’. This paper will introduce the Egyptian objects in Ireland giving particular focus to the National Museum of Ireland collection and how investigating their archive can give insight to the history of Egyptology in Ireland, its collection’s provenance and, by extension, its connections to empire.
Caterina Zaggia, Julia Dawson, Helen Strudwick, Marcos Martinon-Torres, and Matthew Collins (Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge)
Putting ancient Egyptian plaster in its place. Definitions, development and terminology from the Old Kingdom to the Roman Period
The term ‘plaster’ is ubiquitous in Egyptological literature: it is a key component of cartonnage, for casting, gap-filling and modelling, and as a substrate for painting and gilding. There has been some study of ‘plaster’ in architectural contexts, but detailed examination, analysis and description of its use on objects is very limited. Its potential to contribute to object context and provenance studies remains largely unexplored. The word ‘plaster’ is loosely applied to technology and chemistry that include both true plasters (made from lime and gypsum cements) and mud, calcium carbonate- and calcium sulphate-based pastes mixed with a variety of organic binding media, or a combination of all these materials.